Brown Arts Initiative

Events + Exhibitions

Join us for events, exhibitions, workshops, and more.

Upcoming Events

  • State of Urgency Exhibition

    Location: Granoff Center for the Creative Arts Room: Cohen Gallery
    Show Details

    Protest Posters created for the Rhode Island Community by the Print Like You Give A Damn Press Collective - Summer 2020

    Print Like You Give A Damn Press Collective includes Kate Aitchison, Allison Bianco, Raynold Bidon, Julia Brough, Ian Cozzens, Ryan Dean, Tatiana Gomez Gaggero, Lara Henderson, Sara Inacio, Erin Lobb, Jose Menendez and Nafis M. White
    On view through Dec 15, 2020. During Fall 2020, Cohen Gallery is available to visitors to view through the west facing windows. 
    More information available here
  • ONLINE EXHIBITION PREMIERE | Raymond Hood and the American Skyscraper

    12:00 pm

    Architectural Historian Vincent Scully called Raymond Hood “the greatest skyscraper architect of all time” and the New Yorker once labelled him the “brilliant bad boy of architecture.” The exhibition employs Hood’s skyscrapers as a lens through which to examine architectural education and genesis as well as architectural technology and illumination.

  • The Brazil Initiative invites the Brown U community & beyond to join CineBrasil 2020-online special edition.

    Please join us on October 29th for our fourth session, fifth film, The Fever, by director Maya Da-Rin.


    The film is set in Manaus, an industrial city surrounded by the Amazon rainforest. Justino, a middle-aged member of the indigenous Desana people, works as a security guard at the cargo port. Since his wife’s death, his primary interactions are with his youngest daughter, Vanessa, with whom he lives on the outskirts of town. She works as a nurse at a health clinic and is accepted to study medicine in Brasilia and will need to be leaving soon.

    As the days go by, Justino is overcome by a bad fever. During the day, he fights to stay awake at work. During the night, a mysterious creature follows his footsteps. But soon, the tedious routine of the harbor is broken by the arrival of a new guard. Meanwhile, his brother’s visit makes Justino remember life in the forest from twenty years ago. Between the city’s oppression and the distance of his native village in the forest, Justino can no longer endure existence without place.

    To reserve your FREE ticket on Eventive click here . You will be prompted to “Watch Now.” Please click on “Watch Now” and you will be able to reserve your ticket for October 23-29.

    The film is available on Eventive to begin watching on October 23rd at 5:05 pm until Thursday, October 29 at 7:05 pm EST.

    At 8 pm on October 29, the Brazil Initiative will host a discussion with the director Maya Da-Rin via Zoom .

    Please check out this link to register for any or all of the films that we have scheduled as part of CineBrasil 2020.

    - Pacarrete (Allan Deberton 2019), October 7-8th

    - Seven Years in May (Affonso Uchôa 2019) & Dazed Flesh (Grace Passô & Ricardo Alves Júnior, 2019), October 14-15

    - Hard Paint (Filipe Matzembacher, Marcio Reolon 2018), available for viewing October 19-22 with a discussion with the directors October 22

    - The Fever (Maya Da-Rin 2019), available for viewing October 23-29 with a discussion with the director October 29.

    - ***Halloween Special Event!***TheCemeteryof Lost Souls (Rodrigo Aragão 2020), available for viewing October 30-November 3 ***Halloween Special Event!***

    - Party Over (Hilton Lacerda 2019), available for viewing October 30-November 5 with a discussion with the director November 5.

  • Virtual

    Halloween New Play Festival

    Location: Virtual Event Cost: FREE
    Registration Required
    http://brown.edu/go/HalloweenPlayFestivalTix
    Show Details

    Halloween New Play Festival
    A Festival of Spooky Play Readings & Workshops
    by Brown University students.

    October 30 – November 1
    Virtual on Zoom & Youtube

    Registration is required.
    You will receive the link to the Zoom Webinar in your registration confirmation email.
    http://brown.edu/go/HalloweenPlayFestivalTix

    FEATURING:

    A staged virtual reading of:
    Garfieldland by Dylan Lewis ’22
    Directed by Jarrett Key ’13

    – Live on Zoom October 30 @ 6PM EST
    – Streamable on Youtube October 31 – November 2: (Link provided 10/31)

    Welcome to Garfieldland! The amusement park dedicated to everyone’s favorite cartoon cat (not to be confused with the president). Come to Garfieldland to relive childhood memories filled with joy, learn your truest self, and discover the power of play! We look forward to meeting you. See you soon!

    Register at: http://brown.edu/go/HalloweenPlayFestivalTix


    A staged virtual reading of:
    All My Pretty Chickens by Masha Breeze ’22 & Hillel Rosenshine ’22
    Directed by Connie Crawford

    – Live on Zoom October 30 @ 9PM EST:
    – Streamable on Youtube October 31 – November 2: (Link provided 10/31)

    All My Pretty Chickens (AAll mmmy britty ghikinz) ((All my gritty dickins ??))) is a rehearsed reading over zoom about a farmer and his livestock. It’s basically Macbeth but Macbeth is a sick sick boy and Lady Macbeth is a fishwife. Do you like onions? We have three. Get your tickets now (free!) and claim your complimentary anemic gourd.

    Register at: http://brown.edu/go/HalloweenPlayFestivalTix


    A reading and live workshop of:
    Blue Roses by Clare Boyle ’20.5
    Directed by Caroline Sprague ’20.5

    – Live on Zoom November 1 @ 2PM EST: 

    Funerals are f**king expensive.
    Cass knows it. He’s grown up working for his six Polish aunties at the funeral home they run together. At 28, he’s never left their hometown, and he wants out.
    Funerals are f**king expensive.
    That’s why Maria dreams of becoming a mortician and making death care more accessible. It’s just a hard industry to break into.
    Maybe they can help each other out?

    Register at: http://brown.edu/go/HalloweenPlayFestivalTix

  • Virtual

    Midnight Halloween Organ Recital

    Show Details

    Mark Steinbach, Brown University Organist and Senior Lecturer in Music, will perform the annual Midnight Halloween Organ Recital on October 31 at 11:59pm from Sayles Hall on the 1903 Hutchings-Votey pipe organ. This year, the performance will be streamed to audiences live via Zoom. The URL will be made available closer to the event date. Please mark your calendars and tune in for this special event!

    Mark Steinbach’s performance is co-presented by the Office of the Chaplains and Religious Life and the Department of Music.

    Program

    Apparition de l’église éternelle, Olivier Messiaen (1908-1992)

    Marche Funèbre d’une Marionnette, op. 35, no. 2, Charles Gounod (1818-1893) (transcribed by Mark Steinbach)

    Prelude in g minor, BWV 558
    Fuga in g minor, BWV 578, Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

    Canon in B minor, op. 56, no. 5, Robert Schumann (1810-1856)

    Suite Gothique, op. 25, Léon Boëllmann (1862-1897)
    I. Choral-Introduction
    II. Menuet gothique
    III. Prière à Notre-Dame
    IV. Toccata

    Prélude sur une Antienne, Jean Langlais (1907-1991)

    Toccata con Fuga in d minor, BWV 565, Johann Sebastian Bach

    About Mark Steinbach

    Mark Steinbach is University Organist, Curator of Instruments, and Senior Lecturer in Music at Brown University, where he teaches applied organ lessons, music theory, and seminars on such topics as Olivier Messiaen, and performance and analysis. Mr. Steinbach concertizes and teaches frequently throughout the United States and Europe. A passionate advocate of new music, he premiered compositions of Brown composers Eric Nathan and Wang Lu at Notre-Dame de Paris and Berlin’s Nikolai-kirche in summer 2016. He appeared in music festivals in Dresden, Berlin, and other venues in Germany in 2017. He performed solo recitals at festivals in Freiberg Cathedral, Rötha, Görlitz, Weimar, and Aosta Cathedral in summer 2018. He presented a class at the 2018 National Convention of the American Guild of Organists on Healthy Practice Technique.

    Mr. Steinbach has performed for the National Conventions of the American Guild of Organists, the Organ Historical Society, the Piccolo Spoleto Festival, the International Organ Festival at the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam, the Courmayeur, Bolzano, Storici Organi della Valsesia, and Picena international organ festivals in Italy and organ festivals in Berlin, Halle, and Lüneburg, Germany. He performed the world premiere of Daniel Pinkham’s “Odes” at the American Guild of Organists Regional Convention and the U.S. premiere of Nico Muhly’s “O Antiphon Preludes” at Brown University. Mr. Steinbach has been featured on National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered” performing on the 1640’s English cabinet organ in Wickford, Rhode Island, the oldest church organ in use in the United States. Mr. Steinbach served as Organist and Choirmaster of historic St. Paul’s Church in Wickford, Rhode Island for 23 years, building a substantial multi-generational music program.

    Mr. Steinbach earned the bachelor of music degree from the University of Kansas. As a Fulbright scholar he studied with Peter Planyavsky in Vienna, Austria. He earned the master of music and doctor of musical arts degrees from The Eastman School of Music where he studied organ with David Craighead and harpsichord with Arthur Haas.

    Mr. Steinbach’s critically acclaimed CD Organ Works of Anton Heiller (Loft) has been featured on America Public Media’s Pipedreams and The Organ Loft. Mr. Steinbach has adjudicated several organ competitions, including the American Guild of Organists National Young Artists Competition. His recent recording “Glass and Bach in Dresden” on the 1755 Silbermann organ in Dresden is expected to be released in 2020.

    About the Sayles Hall Organ

    The Sayles Hall Organ was a gift in 1903 of Lucian Sharpe (class of 1893) in memory of his parents. The Latin inscription on the organ’s oak case reads,“Parentibus et Academiae Pignus Pietatis” or “to (my) parents and the academy, a token of devotion.” For many years, the student body had been extremely vocal about wanting a pipe organ. In his annual report of 1902, President Faunce referred to a new organ for Sayles Hall as “one of our greatest small needs.” Following the lead of Symphony Hall in Boston, Vassar and Yale, the University contracted with the Hutchings-Votey Company of Boston. To receive the organ, which weighed about 25 tons, the old gallery in Sayles Hall was replaced by a new one with a projecting center, under the direction of architects Stone, Carpenter, and Willson. The Hutchings-Votey Organhas three manuals, with fifty-one speaking stops, more than three thousand pipes, wind reservoirs,and over on hundred miles of wiring. The swell and choir organs are enclosed in separate swell boxes.

    At Commencement in June 1903, the opening recital was performed by eminent Belgian organist Chevalier Auguste Wiengand, who was then the Sydney Town Hall Organist. In 1924, Mrs. Lownes endowed an annual organ recital known as “Edgar J. Lownes Memory Day,” a memorial to her late husband. In 1949, the organ received its first complete renovation,which involved the installation of a new console designed by the Schantz Organ Company. The organ fell into a state of disrepair in the 1980’s after hurricane water damage. The latest renovation of the instrument was undertaken in 1990 by the Potter-Rathburn Organ Company of Cranston, RI. By the 1950’s, the trend of much of the organ world was the replace, rather than restore or repair, and many fine instruments were lost. Fortunately the Brown organ is still sounding forth and is now the largest remaining Hutchings-Votey organ.

    Adapted from Encyclopaedia Brunonia, Martha Mitchell, and the Brown Alumni Monthly, May 1903

  • Music Now is an informal forum series for Brown’s community of composers and music scholars. This week’s guest is Laura Stokes, Brown University Performing Arts Librarian. Music Now talks are free and open to the public.

    About this Talk, “Fanny Hensel’s Lied ‘Der Fürst vom Berge’ in Light of Contemporary European Politics”

    In 1839–1840, the composer Fanny Hensel, her artist husband Wilhelm, and their son Sebastian traveled to Italy. As a memoir of their time in Italy, Fanny and Wilhelm created the Reise-Album, a collaborative compilation of artwork, compositions, and texts. The Lied “Der Fürst vom Berge,” with music by Fanny and text and pencil vignette by Wilhelm, is one of the musical works in this album. The text and music present an ambiguous picture of a princely ruler: one who glories in his power and makes seemingly arbitrary decisions about who among his subjects will meet with happiness and honors, or punishment and disgrace. Although the martial rhythms of the central motif suggest the monarch’s dignity, Hensel’s harmonic language, unstable hypermeter, and fading ending indicate capriciousness and precariousness rather than certainty and security.

    The chronology of the trip and the mountain motifs in the drawing indicate that this work was likely composed during, or in remembrance of, the Hensels’ travel in the Alps during their return to Berlin in 1840. Fanny’s journal entries from that time offer clues to a potential interpretation of this Lied. She discusses two contemporary political figures: the new king of Prussia, Friedrich Wilhelm IV, who had reinstated the standing of the disgraced scholars known as the Göttingen Seven, and, in a different vein, the nobleman and revolutionary Federico Confalonieri, whom the Hensels had met in Bellinzona, Switzerland, and who had been exiled from his native Italy. The Hensels’ Lied thus offers insights into the complex politics of the time, as well as into the nature of the artistic collaboration between husband and wife.

    About Laura Stokes

    Laura K. T. Stokes is the Performing Arts Librarian at Brown University, where she has also been a Lecturer in Music. She holds a Ph.D. in musicology from Indiana University. Her scholarly work examines music and cultural politics in the nineteenth century, including music for public ritual, opera, sacred music, gender and composition, and music publishing history. Her current projects are on the composers Fanny Hensel, Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, and Giacomo Meyerbeer, as well as music and politics, historiography, and nineteenth-century medievalism. From 2012–2018, she was an Assistant Editor of the journal Notes.

  • Virtual

    remant - performance & talkback

    Location: Virtual
    Show Details

    </remnant>

    11/6, 7:00pm performance with talkback to follow

    11/7, 12:00pm performance

    Theater Mitu’s </remnant> is an interactive digital reimagining of the company’s 2018 live theatrical production built from interviews conducted around the world concerning death, loss, and what is left behind.

    Part performance, part sound art, part interactive website - this online theatrical experience offers audiences an intimate reflection on how loss can scar us, shape us, and at times propel us towards change—towards understanding what we should fight for and why.

    Presented by the Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies and Brown Arts Initiative. Registration is required for this event and will begin Nov 1. Registered participants will receive an automatic response containing a link and password to join the event. Free and open to the public.

  • Trombonist Chris Washburne, Associate Professor of Music at Columbia University, joins Professor Anthony Cheung as a guest speaker for Cheung’s course, MUSC 2120 The Jazz Orchestra and Orchestral Approaches to Jazz. The virtual talk is free and open to the public. Please write to Professor Cheung directly, if you would like to attend.

    Guest Speaker Series

    Professor Washburne’s visit is part of a series of MUSC 2120 The Jazz Orchestra and Orchestral Approaches to Jazz guest talks this semester. Click here to view all upcoming MUSC 2120 talks in the series .

    About Chris Washburne

    Chris Washburne is Associate Professor of Music at Columbia University and the founder and director of Columbia’s Louis Armstrong Jazz Performance Program. He has published numerous articles on jazz, Latin jazz, and salsa. His newest book, Sounding Salsa: Performing Latin Music in New York was published in 2008 by Temple University Press. He co-edited the volume Bad Music (Routledge, 2004) and is currently working on a book on Latin jazz which will be published by Oxford University Press.

    As a trombonist, he has toured extensively with various groups and concertized throughout the Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. He has commissioned and premiered over twenty contemporary compositions for trombone and has performed on over 150 recordings. His highly acclaimed Latin jazz group, SYOTOS, is the busiest and most in demand Latin jazz groups in New York, performing at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, BAM, the Blue Note, MOMA, Smoke, Dizzy’s Coca Cola Club, Smalls, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. His jazz group, FFEAR, co-led by saxophonist Ole Mathisen, has been featured on NPR’s JazzSet, hosted by Dee Dee Bridgewater and regularly tours in Europe. He has been hailed as “One of the best trombonists in salsa…” by Peter Watrous of The New York Times and “one of the most important trombonists performing today” by Brad Walseth of jazzchicago.net.

    He was voted as “Rising Star of the Trombone” numerous times in the annual Downbeat Critics Poll. He has performed with Tito Puente, Celia Cruz, Eddie Palmieri, Muhal Richard Abrams, Ruben Blades, Celine Dion, Gloria Estefan, Justin Timberlake, Marc Anthony, Björk, They Might Be Giants, Roscoe Mitchell, Grady Tate, Jaki Byard, Duke Ellington Orchestra, Danilo Caymmi, Ran Blake, the Smithereens, Don Richols, Arturo Sandoval, Hilton Ruíz, Lawrence “Butch” Morris, Roswell Rudd, Walter Thompson, RMM Allstar Salsa Band, Eddie Henderson, Anthony Braxton, Ray Barretto, John Cale, Baba Olatunje, Candido, Freddie Cole, Maria Schneider Big Band, Chico O’Farrill, Leslie Uggams, Dicapo Opera Company, St. Luke’s Chamber Orchestra, Bang on a Can All-stars, SEM Ensemble, American Microtonal Festival Chamber Orchestra, and the Dinosaur Annex under the direction of Gunther Schuller, among many others.

    About MUSC 2120 The Jazz Orchestra and Orchestral Approaches to Jazz

    MUSC 2120 Instructor: Anthony Cheung

    This course offers several views of what it means to write for the “jazz orchestra.” As the history of jazz tends to prioritize the contributions of individuals and small groups, what does it mean for composers who have ambitions that extend beyond typical expectations of instrumental forces, duration, and form? We will focus on specific examples that have challenged conventions and redefined idioms. From the innovations in orchestration and scale of the Duke Ellington Orchestra and the classic Gil Evans/Miles Davis albums, to the “progressive” experiments of Stan Kenton (and later Don Ellis), to the intergalactic theater of the Sun Ra Arkestra, to works for full symphony orchestra, we will examine complex issues of tradition, community, and race that have accompanied these collaborations, and the compatibility (or not) of musical challenges regarding improvisation, notation, and pedagogy.

  • Virtual

    Katherine Bradford | Artist Talk

    Show Details
    Katherine Bradford (born 1942) is an American artist based in New York, best known for paintings of swimmers, superheroes and ships that critics describe as simultaneously representational and abstract, luminous, and richly metaphorical.She began her career as an artist relatively late in life and has achieved her widest recognition in her seventies, through New York gallery shows at CANADA, Sperone Westwater, and Edward Thorp. Writing about her work’s adventurousness, open-ended process, refusal of canonical either/or conundrums (representational-abstract, formal-narrative) and relevance to younger artists, critic John Yau called Bradford, among others, “an important figure in an alternative history that has yet to receive the attention it deserves.”

    Bradford has exhibited internationally and in shows at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth (solo), MoMA PS1, Brooklyn Museum, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and University of the Arts (Philadelphia), among others. She has received awards from the John Simon Guggenheim, Joan Mitchell and Pollock-Krasner foundations and the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and her work belongs to the public art collections including those of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, Dallas Museum of Art, Menil Collection, and Portland Museum of Art.
    Note: Registration for Virtual Artist Talks open two weeks prior to the event. All talks moderated by Heather Bhandari. Attendees will have the opportunity to submit questions to the moderator during registration and during the live event. The microphones and videos of attendees will be disabled to ensure audio and video quality. The conversation will be recorded.
    In partnership with the Brown Arts Initiative.
  • Virtual

    Lincoln’s Lie: Reading and Conversation with Elizabeth Mitchell

    Location: Virtual Cost: Free
    Show Details

    Elizabeth Mitchell ’88 reads from her recently published book Lincoln’s Lie. Following the reading, Elizabeth will be joined in conversation by faculty members Emily Hipchen and Elizabeth Rush from the Department of English. 

    In 1864, during the bloodiest days of the Civil War, two newspapers published a call, allegedly authored by President Lincoln, for the immediate conscription of 400,000 more Union soldiers. New York streets erupted in pandemonium. Wall Street markets went wild.

    When Lincoln sent troops to seize the newspaper presses and arrest the editors, it became clear: the proclamation was a lie. Who put out this fake news? Was it a Confederate spy hoping to incite another draft riot? A political enemy out to ruin the president in an election year? Or was there some truth to the proclamation—far more truth than anyone suspected? 

    In Lincoln’s Lie, Mitchell brings to life the remarkable story of the manipulators of the news and why they decided to play such a dangerous game during a critical period of American history. Her account of Lincoln’s troubled relationship to the press and its role in the Civil War is one that speaks powerfully to our current political crises: fake news, profiteering, Constitutional conflict, and a president at war with the press. Lincoln’s Lieis available for purchase in person or online through the Brown University Bookstore.


    Presented by Brown Arts Initiative as part of the REMAKING fiction/nonfictionseries taking place Nov 10 - 15. This mini series features artists complicating “truth” by means of imaginative interventions, complicating what’s “made up” via worldly interruption, complicating authorship by questioning authenticity and ownership, and ultimately finding ways to push the messiness of “real” and “fake” into our faces for renewed consideration To view a complete list of events visit the REMAKING fiction/nonfiction page.

  • Virtual

    Raja Feather Kelly in Conversation

    Location: Virtual Cost: Free
    Show Details

    Join Brown Arts Initiative for a conversation with Raja Feather Kelly and Professor Sydney Skybetter, department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies. Kelly and Skybetter will discuss Kelly’s work The Love Episode, available for a limited run viewing Nov 10 - 15 online here.

    Choreographer/Director Raja Feather Kelly is the artistic director of New Brooklyn Theatre. In 2009, he founded the dance-theatre-media company the feath3r theory. The two companies merged in 2018. Raja has been awarded a Creative Capital Award (2019), a National Dance Project Production Grant (2019), a Breakout Award from the Stage Directors and Choreographers Foundation (2018),

    The Love Episode is a 2017 American docufiction performance, which premiered as part of Lumberyard in The City June 22-24, 2017. Directed by Raja Feather Kelly, the performance stars Kelly and his company as themselves performing a post-ballet theatre musical that reimagines and attempts to recreate the unrecorded, deleted and lost footage from Saturday Night Live’s 2015 Episode on Love and War (The Love Episode).


    Presented by Brown Arts Initiative as part of the REMAKING fiction/nonfictionseries taking place Nov 10 - 15. This mini series features artists complicating “truth” by means of imaginative interventions, complicating what’s “made up” via worldly interruption, complicating authorship by questioning authenticity and ownership, and ultimately finding ways to push the messiness of “real” and “fake” into our faces for renewed consideration To view a complete list of events visit the REMAKING fiction/nonfiction page.

  • Virtual

    Chaitanya Tamhane in Conversation

    Location: Virtual Cost: Free
    Show Details

    Join Brown Arts Initiative for a conversation with filmmaker Chaitanya Tamhane and Prof. Karan Mahajan, Department of Literary Arts. Tamhane and Mahajan will discuss Tamhane’s film Court.

    Chaitanya Tamhane is an independent filmmaker based in Mumbai. His debut feature film Courtpremiered at the Venice Film Festival in 2014, where it was awarded the Best Film - Orizzonti and the Lion of the Future award. It has since gone on to win over 30 awards at film festivals worldwide. Courtwon the National Award for Best Feature Film and was India’s official entry for the 2016 Oscars. Court, in which a social activist who uses folk music to spread his message is arrested and accused of inciting a sewage worker’s suicide is available to view online Nov 10 - 15.


    Presented by Brown Arts Initiative as part of the REMAKING fiction/nonfictionseries taking place Nov 10 - 15. This mini series features artists complicating “truth” by means of imaginative interventions, complicating what’s “made up” via worldly interruption, complicating authorship by questioning authenticity and ownership, and ultimately finding ways to push the messiness of “real” and “fake” into our faces for renewed consideration To view a complete list of events visit the REMAKING fiction/nonfiction page.

  • Virtual

    Kirsten Johnson ‘87, Michelle Ellsworth and Mary Ellen Carroll in Conversation

    Location: Virtual Cost: Free
    Show Details

    Join filmmaker Kirsten Johnson ’87, interdisciplinary artist Michelle Ellsworth and conceptual artist Mary Ellen Carroll as they discuss the humorous, sometimes absurd, and intensely poignant projects they’ve undertaken as they grapple with mortality.

    Projects discussed will include Kirsten Johnson’s film Dick Johnson is Dead, Michelle Ellsworth’s interdisciplinary project Preparation Yand Mary Ellen Carroll’s performance and film My Death Is Pending Because … Featured projects will be available to audiences Nov 10 - 15 on the REMAKING fiction/nonfiction webpage.


    Presented by Brown Arts Initiative as part of the REMAKING fiction/nonfictionseries taking place Nov 10 - 15. This mini series features artists complicating “truth” by means of imaginative interventions, complicating what’s “made up” via worldly interruption, complicating authorship by questioning authenticity and ownership, and ultimately finding ways to push the messiness of “real” and “fake” into our faces for renewed consideration To view a complete list of events visit the REMAKING fiction/nonfiction page.

  • Saxophonist and composer Ingrid Laubrock joins Professor Anthony Cheung as a guest speaker for Cheung’s course, MUSC 2120 The Jazz Orchestra and Orchestral Approaches to Jazz. The virtual talk is free and open to the public. Please write to Professor Cheung directly, if you would like to attend.

    Guest Speaker Series

    Ingrid Laubrock’s visit is part of a series of MUSC 2120 The Jazz Orchestra and Orchestral Approaches to Jazz guest talks this semester. Click here to view all upcoming MUSC 2120 talks in the series .

    About Ingrid Laubrock

    Originally from Germany, Ingrid Laubrock is a saxophonist/composer based in Brooklyn since 2009. Laubrock is interested in exploring the borders between musical realms and creating multi-layered, dense and often evocative sound worlds.

    She has worked with Anthony Braxton, Muhal Richards Abrams, Dave Douglas, Kenny Wheeler, Jason Moran, Tim Berne, William Parker, Tom Rainey, Mary Halvorson, Kris Davis, Tyshawn Sorey, Craig Taborn, Luc Ex, Django Bates’ Human Chain, The Continuum Ensemble, Wet Ink and many others.

    Laubrock’s main projects as a leader are Anti-House, Sleepthief, Ingrid Laubrock Septet and Ubatuba. Collaborations include Paradoxical Frog, Ingrid Laubrock/Tom Rainey Duo and Crump/Smythe/Laubrock. She is a member of Anthony Braxton’s Falling River Music Quartet, Nonet and 12+1tet, Tom Rainey Trio and Obbligato, Mary Halvorson Septet, Kris’ Davis Quintet, Nate Wooley’s Battle Pieces and Luc Ex’ Assemblée. She was one of the featured soloists in Anthony Braxton’s opera Trillium J.

    Awards include the BBC Jazz Award for Innovation in 2004, a Fellowship in Jazz Composition by the Arts Foundation in 2006, the 2009 SWR German Radio Jazz Prize, the 2014 German Record Critics Quarterly Award, Downbeat Annual Critics Poll Rising Star Soprano Saxophone (2015) , Rising Star Tenor Saxophone (2018) and Herb Alpert/Ragdale Prize in Composition 2019.

    Commissions include Jammy Dodgers for Jazz Quintet and dancers (Covent Garden Opera 2006), Nonet Music for Cheltenham Jazz Festival 2007, Octet for SWR New Jazz Meeting 2011, Echo for SZOctet (A L’Arme Festival 2015) and chamber orchestra pieces Vogelfrei (ACO/Tricentric Foundation 2014) and Contemporary Chaos Practices (moers festival 2017) and Chants II (Wet Ink 2018).

    Laubrock was Improviser in Residence 2012 in the German city Moers. The post is created to introduce creative music into the city throughout the year. As part of this she led a regular improvisation ensemble and taught sound workshops in elementary schools.

    Other teaching experiences include improvisation workshops at Towson University, CalArts, UC San Diego, UC Irvine, Baruch College, University of Michigan, University of Newcastle and many others.

    About MUSC 2120 The Jazz Orchestra and Orchestral Approaches to Jazz

    MUSC 2120 Instructor: Anthony Cheung

    This course offers several views of what it means to write for the “jazz orchestra.” As the history of jazz tends to prioritize the contributions of individuals and small groups, what does it mean for composers who have ambitions that extend beyond typical expectations of instrumental forces, duration, and form? We will focus on specific examples that have challenged conventions and redefined idioms. From the innovations in orchestration and scale of the Duke Ellington Orchestra and the classic Gil Evans/Miles Davis albums, to the “progressive” experiments of Stan Kenton (and later Don Ellis), to the intergalactic theater of the Sun Ra Arkestra, to works for full symphony orchestra, we will examine complex issues of tradition, community, and race that have accompanied these collaborations, and the compatibility (or not) of musical challenges regarding improvisation, notation, and pedagogy.

  • Virtual

    Music Now Talk with Eric Nathan

    Show Details

    Music Now is an informal forum series for Brown’s community of composers and music scholars. This week’s guest is Eric Nathan, composer and David S. Josephson Assistant Professor of Music, who will speak about his recent music in the context of his work over the past few years. Music Now talks are free and open to the public.

    About Eric Nathan

    Eric Nathan’s (b. 1983) music has been called “as diverse as it is arresting” with a “constant vein of ingenuity and expressive depth” (San Francisco Chronicle), “thoughtful and inventive” (The New Yorker), and as “a marvel of musical logic” (Boston Classical Review).

    A 2013 Rome Prize Fellow and 2014 Guggenheim Fellow, Nathan has been commissioned by leading ensembles and institutions including the New York Philharmonic, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, Tanglewood Music Center, Aspen Music Festival, Boston Musica Viva, Collage New Music, The New York Virtuoso Singers, Fromm Music Foundation and Barlow Endowment. The Boston Symphony Orchestra has commissioned three works, including a chamber work, “Why Old Places Matter” (2014) for the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, and two orchestral works, “the space of a door” (2016), that Andris Nelsons and the BSO premiered in November 2016 and commercially released on the Naxos label in 2019, and “Concerto for Orchestra” which Nelsons premiered on the 2019-20 season-opening concerts, and was scheduled to repeat at Tanglewood in summer 2020 (canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic).

    Nathan’s works have also been presented nationally and internationally at the New York Philharmonic’s 2014 and 2016 Biennials, Louvre Museum, the 2012 and 2013 World Music Days, Emily Dickinson Museum, Nasher Sculpture Center and at the festivals of Aldeburgh, Aspen, Cabrillo, Domaine Forget, MATA, Ravina Steans Institute, and Tanglewood. In 2019, Yellow Barn featured Nathan’s 50-minute dramatic song cycle, “Some Favored Nook,” created in collaboration with librettist Mark Campbell, on opening night of its 50th anniversary season. Composer portrait concerts of Nathan’s music have been presented by the Berlin Philharmonic’s Scharoun Ensemble Berlin at the American Academy in Rome, by the Hudson Valley Music Club, and at the Tenri Cultural Institute (New York). In April 2020, the Longy School of Music was scheduled to present a portrait concert featuring the premiere of Nathan’s evening-length work, “Missing Words” (canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic).

    Nathan’s music has additionally been performed by orchestras including the National Symphony Orchestra, Boston Modern Orchestra Project (BMOP), Louisville Orchestra, Charleston Symphony Orchestra, Charlotte Symphony Orchestra, Omaha Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Daejeon Philharmonic Orchestra, A Far Cry and New York Classical Players. Chamber ensembles have performed Nathan’s work, such as International Contemporary Ensemble, Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, Ensemble Dal Niente, JACK Quartet, and American Brass Quintet. In addition, Nathan’s music has been performed by sopranos Tony Arnold, Jessica Rivera, Lucy Shelton and Dawn Upshaw; violinists Jennifer Koh and Stefan Jackiw; baritone William Sharp; and pianists Gloria Cheng, Gilbert Kalish and Molly Morkoski.

    Nathan began an appointment as Composer-in-Residence with the New England Philharmonic in the 2019-20 season. He has previously served as Composer-in-Residence at the Chelsea Music Festival (New York) and Chamber Music Campania (Italy). Nathan has completed an artist residencies at Yellow Barn, Copland House and the American Academy in Rome, and will be a fellow at Civitella Ranieri Foundation in 2021. Nathan has been honored with awards including a Fromm Commission, ASCAP’s Rudolf Nissim Prize, four ASCAP Morton Gould Awards, BMI’s William Schuman Prize, Aspen Music Festival’s Jacob Druckman Prize, a Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and Leonard Bernstein Fellowship from the Tanglewood Music Center.

    In 2015, Albany Records released a debut album of Nathan’s solo and chamber music, “Multitude, Solitude: Eric Nathan,” produced by Grammy-winning producer Judith Sherman, featuring the Momenta Quartet, trombonist Joseph Alessi, violist Samuel Rhodes, oboist Peggy Pearson, pianist Mei Rui, and trumpeter Hugo Moreno. (Le) Poisson Rouge presented a CD release concert of Nathan’s music in October 2015. In 2019, Chelsea Music Festival Records released “Eric Nathan: Dancing with J.S. Bach,” featuring conductor Ken-David Masur in Nathan’s two suites of orchestrations of Bach keyboard works. In May 2020, Gil Rose and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project released a portrait album of Nathan’s orchestral and large ensemble music on the BMOP Sound label. Nathan’s music has additionally been released on Bridge Records.

    Nathan is also a passionate educator and advocate for contemporary composers. He serves as David S. Josephson Assistant Professor of Music in composition and theory at Brown University’s Department of Music. At Brown, he teaches a variety of subjects from composition to popular music history that engage students with and without backgrounds in music. In 2018, he was awarded Brown University’s most prestigious award for junior faculty, the Henry Merritt Wriston Fellowship, that recognizes excellence in teaching. He has additionally served as Visiting Assistant Professor at Williams College and has taught composition at the New York Philharmonic’s Composer’s Bridge program and at Yellow Barn’s Young Artists Program.

    Nathan completed his doctorate studying at Cornell with Steven Stucky, Roberto Sierra and Kevin Ernste, his masters from Indiana University studying with Claude Baker and Sven-David Sandström, his B.A. from Yale College where he studied with Kathryn Alexander, John Halle, Matthew Suttor and trumpeter Allan Dean, and a diploma from the Pre-College Division of The Juilliard School where he studied composition with Ira Taxin. Nathan additionally was a composition fellow at Tanglewood, Aspen, Aldeburgh and the Composers Conference.

  • Virtual

    Music Now with Erin McKeown

    Show Details

    Music Now is an informal forum series for Brown’s community of composers and music scholars. This week’s guest is BAI Professor of the Practice Erin McKeown. McKeown’s talk will take guests on the path from idea to composition to orchestration to production for the song “Lioness” from her Off-Broadway musical Miss You Like Hell. Music Now talks are free and open to the public. 

    About Erin McKeown

    Erin McKeown is a musician, writer, and producer known internationally for her prolific disregard of stylistic boundaries. Her brash and clever electric guitar playing is something to see. Her singing voice is truly unique —clear, cool, and collected. Over the last 20 years, she has performed around the world, released 10 full length albums, and written for film, television, and theater, all the while refining her distinctive and challenging mix of American musical forms.

    Her first musical, Miss You Like Hell, written with Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Quiara Alegría Hudes, opened Off-Broadway at The Public Theater in 2018. It was nominated for 5 Drama Desk Awards, including Best Lyrics, Best Music and Best Orchestrations, and The Wall Street Journal named it Best Musical of 2018.

    Leading her own band, she has performed at Bonnaroo, Glastonbury, and the Newport Folk Festivals. A familiar presence on NPR and the BBC, McKeown’s songs have also appeared in numerous commercials and television shows.